Wednesday, June 29, 2016

THE COBRA'S PROMISE






Pic.: Anima D'Cunha


Years ago, when I had decided to do something about my poor English, one of the things I did – and found very effective – was telling a nice story in two tenses… the Present and the Past. Over the years, I have helped hundreds of people, who were earnest about improving their English, with the same method… Yes, write a nice story down in both the tenses… and, then, tell it to someone!

This old story dramatically describes as to what happens if we do not learn to be assertive in life… if we do not stand for our rights…




THE COBRA’S PROMISE


PAST:

There lived a Swami in a village temple. People from the village came there to pray. On the way to this temple, there was a large banyan tree, under which, in a hole, lived a cobra, peacefully.

One evening, while the children were playing around the tree, one of them stamped on the snake-hole. The cobra, in his self-defense, attacked the child. The poison quickly spread in child’s body and he died.

A panic spread through the village. “A poisonous cobra lives on the way to temple... He attacks every one,” people started spreading the rumor across the village. Soon, they stopped venturing out of their houses, and the temple looked deserted.

The worried Swami went out into the village to find out as to why no one visited the temple. When people explained to him what had happened, he went to talk to the cobra. He was a holy-man and was blessed with the power to talk to animals and snakes. So, on reaching the spot, he asked the cobra, “My friend, why did you kill that child? People are, now, sacred to come out of their houses... Promise me, that you won’t bite anyone, anymore.”

The faithful cobra, with great respect to the holy-man, immediately gave the promise.

Now, the word went around in the village saying that the Swami, with his power, had taken away the poison from the cobra and turned the snake docile... that, the creature was now helpless and harmless...

So, one by one, the people from the village came out of their houses... and went about their routine work. When they came near the tree, they saw the cobra lying there, coiled up... looking defeated. Some teased him, some abused him, some spat on him and some kicked him. Some children held him by his tail and dragged him all around... and, some tossed him in the air... But, in spite of all this, the cobra did not react. He kept his promise...

Some days later, when Swami was passing by the tree, he saw the cobra in a horrible condition. “What have you done to yourself, my friend?” he asked in disbelief.

“Sir, you had asked me not to bite,” the battered and bruised snake complained to Swami, “now look, what they have done to me!”

‘You fool, yes, I did tell you not to bite,” the Swami screamed at the cobra angrily, “But, did I ever tell you not to hiss?”


PRESENT:

There lives a Swami in a village temple. People from the village come there to pray. On the way to this temple, there is a large banyan tree, under which, in a hole, lives a cobra, peacefully.

One evening, while the children are playing around the tree, one of them stamps on the snake-hole. The cobra, in his self-defense, attacks the child. The poison quickly spreads in child’s body and he dies.

A panic spreads through the village. “A poisonous cobra lives on the way to temple... He attacks every one,” people start spreading the rumor across the village. Soon, they stop venturing out of their houses, and the temple looks deserted.


The worried Swami goes out into the village to find out as to why no one visits the temple. When people explain to him what has happened, he goes to talk to the cobra. He is a holy-man and is blessed with the power to talk to animals and snakes. So, on reaching the spot, he asks the cobra, “My friend, why did you kill that child? People are, now, sacred to come out of their houses... Promise me, that you won’t bite anyone, anymore.”

The faithful cobra, with great respect to the holy-man, immediately gives the promise.

Now, the word goes around in the village saying that the Swami, with his power, has taken away the poison from the cobra and turned the snake docile... That, the creature is, now, helpless and harmless...

So, one by one, the people from the village come out of their houses... and go about their routine work. When they come near the tree, they see the cobra lying there, coiled up... looking defeated. Some tease him, some abuse him, some spit on him and some kick him. Some children hold him by his tail and drag him all around... and, some toss him in the air... But, in spite of all this, the cobra does not react. He keeps his promise...

Some days later, when Swami is passing by the tree, he sees the cobra in a horrible condition. “What have you done to yourself, my friend?” he asks in disbelief.

“Sir, you had asked me not to bite,” the battered and bruised snake complains to the holy-man, “now look, what they have done to me!”

‘You fool, yes, I did tell you not to bite,” the Swami screams at the cobra angrily, “But, did I ever tell you not to hiss?”


GERALD D’CUNHA

Tuesday, June 28, 2016

YOU TAKE HOME ONLY WHAT YOUR ‘DESERVE’






Pic.: Anima D'Cunha



Years ago, when I had decided to do something about my poor English, one of the things I did – and found very effective – was telling a nice story in two tenses… the Present and the Past. Over the years, I have helped hundreds of people, who were earnest about improving their English, with the same method… Yes, write a nice story down in both the tenses… and, then, tell it to someone!

Every time the thoughts of my future uncertainty come to haunt me, this childhood fable comes to my rescue…


YOU TAKE HOME
ONLY WHAT YOUR ‘DESERVE’


PAST:

In a village, there lived a milkman. Every day, he walked near and far to sell milk in the village. With whatever money he earned, he was content and lived a simple yet happy life with his family. And, as years passed by, a thought began to trouble him: “I am getting older and tired… I won’t be able to go around the village like this for long… The family needs are increasing… my daughters have to be married… and, at this rate, it would be harder for me to face my future.”

Thus, with the hope that he could make some quick money and secure his future, the milkman started adding some quantity of water in the milk, which went unnoticed in the beginning. As time went by, the water quantity in the milk began to increase, and, his customers began to complain. But, by now, the greed had taken strong roots in this milkman… He could not live with the thought of earning less. Insecurity had taken over him… and, he continued to live like that despite the bad name he had now earned for himself…

One afternoon, while returning home, the tired milkman decided to take a short nap under a tree. He placed next to him his money pouch. When he was fast asleep, a monkey picked the pouch, sat on the tree branch, and started doing something interesting: he dropped one coin on the ground and another into the deep well below. Monkey kept doing it till the pouch became empty… When the milkman woke up, he was shocked to see what the monkey was doing. But, by then, the monkey-job was already finished… Milkman’s half the booty had gone into the deep well… while the other half was lying there on the ground!

As he bent down, heart-broken, to collect whatever was lying before him, the milkman heard a voice inside his heart: “Fool, become wiser now… The money that you had earned by adding water in the milk, has gone where it belonged – into the well; the money that you deserve is lying before you…Gather it and go home.”

The milkman paid heed to this voice… and he did not have to worry any more about his future… All was taken care of, including his old age and daughters’ marriage!


PRESENT:

In a village, there lives a milkman. Every day, he walks near and far to sell milk in the village. With whatever money he earns, he is content and lives a simple yet happy life with his family. And, as years pass by, a thought begins to trouble him: “I am getting older and tired… I won’t be able to go around the village like this for long… The family needs are increasing… my daughters have to be married… and, at this rate, it would be harder for me to face my future.”

Thus, with the hope that he can make some quick money and secure his future, the milkman starts adding some quantity of water in the milk, which goes unnoticed in the beginning. As time goes by, the water quantity in the milk begins to increase, and, his customers begin to complain. But, by now, the greed has taken strong roots in this milkman… He cannot live with the thought of earning less. Insecurity has taken over him… and, he continues to live like that despite the bad name he has now earned for himself…


Then, one afternoon, while returning home, the tired milkman decides to take a short nap under a tree. He places next to him his money pouch. When he is fast asleep, a monkey picks the pouch, sits on the tree-branch, and starts doing something interesting: he drops one coin on the ground and another into the deep well below. Monkey keeps doing it till the pouch becomes empty… When the milkman wakes up, he is shocked to see what the monkey is doing. But, by then, the monkey-job is already finished… Milkman’s half the booty has gone into the deep well… while the other half is lying there on the ground!

As he bends down, heart-broken, to collect whatever is lying before him, the milkman hears a voice inside his heart: “Fool, become wiser now… The money that you had earned by adding water in the milk, has gone where it belonged – into the well; the money that you deserve is lying before you…Gather it and go home.”

The milkman pays heed to this voice… and he does not have to worry any more about his future… All is taken care of, including his old age and daughters’ marriage!


GERALD D’CUNHA

Pic.: Anima D'Cunha


Monday, June 27, 2016

DOING OUR KARMA AND DOING OUR DHARMA





Pic.: Azriel D'Souza


Years ago, when I had decided to do something about my poor English, one of the things I did – and found very effective – was telling a nice story in two tenses… the Present and the Past. Over the years, I have helped hundreds of people, who were earnest about improving their English, with the same method… Yes, write a nice story down in both the tenses… and, then, tell it to someone!

This little Zen story has always calmed me down whenever I have struggled to understand
the good and the bad in me… and in the people around me…


DOING OUR KARMA
AND DOING OUR DHARMA

PAST:

One day, a monk was bathing in a river. He saw a scorpion drowning and instinctively placed his hand under the water and gently lifted the creature on his palm. But, the scorpion started jumping and stinging and, soon, fell into the river…

The monk, once again, took his hand under the water to save the drowning scorpion. But, the creature continued to be restless… It continued to attack the monk.

A bystander, who was watching the drama, was shocked… “Sir, why are you trying to save that creature?” he cried, “It is so thankless… Look, at your hand… It is bleeding!”

“My friend, the creature is doing its karma,” the monk explained with a smile, “I am doing my dharma!”


PRESENT:

One day, a monk is bathing in a river. He sees a scorpion drowning and instinctively places his hand under the water and gently lifts the creature on his palm. But, the scorpion starts jumping and stinging and, soon, falls into the river…

The monk, once again, takes his hand under the water to save the drowning scorpion. But, the creature continues to be restless… It continues to attack the monk.

A bystander, who is watching the drama, is shocked. “Sir, why are you trying to save that creature?” he cries, “It is so thankless… Look, at your hand… It is bleeding!”

“My friend, the creature is doing its karma,” the monk explains with a smile, “I am doing my dharma!”


GERALD D’CUNHA

Saturday, June 25, 2016

THE STORY OF THREE DONKEYS









Pic:. Anima D'Cunha


Years ago, when I had decided to do something about my poor English, one of the things I did – and found very effective – was telling a nice story in two tenses… the Present and the Past. Over the years, I have helped hundreds of people, who were earnest about improving their English, with the same method… Yes, write a nice story down in both the tenses… and, then, tell it to someone!

The  story below is one of my favorite childhood stories… I love to call it the story of ‘THREE DONKEYS’!!!


THE STORY OF ‘THREE DONKEYS’


PAST:

One day, a father and his son went to the marketplace to sell some goods. Their donkey had carried the goods for them. By noon, they had sold off their goods and they were on their way home.

As goods were not there, the son was sitting on the donkey. A passerby saw this and exclaimed, “How bad… The young man is enjoying the ride and the poor old-father is made to walk in the hot sun!”

On hearing this, the son came down and the father went up!

They had barely moved some distance… when another passerby saw them and cried, “What a pity… The strong man is having his joyride while the poor little-son is made to drag his feet in the scorching heat!”

Immediately, the father pulled his son up on the donkey and the donkey began to carry them both!

Just then, another passerby saw them and threw his hands up in dismay, “How heartless humans can be… The poor donkey is made to carry two strong-humans!”

Instantly, the father and the son, both, got off the donkey, lifted him up… and carrying him all the way home!”


PRESENT:

One day, a father and his son go to the market place to sell some goods. Their donkey has carried the goods for them. By noon, they have sold off all the goods and they are on their way home…

As goods are not there, the son is sitting on the donkey. A passerby sees this and exclaims: ““How bad… The young man is enjoying the ride and the poor old-father is made to walk in the hot sun!”

On hearing this, the son comes down and the father goes up!

They have barely moved some distance… when another passerby sees them and cries, “What a pity… The strong man is having his joyride while the poor little-son is made to drag his feet in the scorching heat!”

Immediately, the father pulls his son up on the donkey and the donkey begins to carry them both!

Just then, another passerby sees them and throws his hands up in dismay, “How heartless humans can be… The poor donkey is made to carry two strong humans!”

Instantly, the father and the son, both, get off the donkey, lift him up… and carry him all the way home!”


GERALD D’CUNHA

Friday, June 24, 2016

THE KITE AND THE CROWS





Pic.: Anima D'Cunha

Years ago, when I had decided to do something about my poor English, one of the things I did – and found very effective – was telling a nice story in two tenses… the Present and the Past. Over the years, I have helped hundreds of people, who were earnest about improving their English, with the same method… Yes, write a nice story down in both the tenses… and, then, tell it to someone!

Presently, I am helping a young businessman by the name Pravin Pahuja. “Just twenty stories, Pravin,” I have told him, “You write down just twenty nice stories in two tenses… and, then, narrate them to someone in the same way… Your English will fall in place and, along with it, you will become an effective communicator, too.”

Pravin has already written some… This is one of them…

PAST:
In a village, the fishermen had just returned after their daily catch. As they were sorting out the fishes, a kite swooped down, picked a fish by its beak and shot up into the skies. Immediately, hundreds of crows appeared from nowhere and started chasing the kite…

Whichever direction the kite took, the crows followed, filling the sky with their crazy noise… The kite went East, the crows went East… the kite went West, the crows went West… The kite went North, the crows did the same… the kite went South, the crows did, too…

Finally, the kite was tired and frustrated. It decided to drop the fish. And, as soon as the fish was dropped, the crows stopped chasing the kite and went after the falling fish… The kite, now relieved of the stress, decided to settle down on the branch of a nearby tree. Sitting there, it watched the crazy sight… and declared:
“There goes, with that wretched fish, all my misery!”

PRESENT:

In a village, the fishermen have just returned after their daily catch. As they are sorting out the fishes, a kite swoops down, picks a fish by its beak and shoots up into the skies. Immediately, hundreds of crows appear from nowhere and start chasing the kite…

Whichever direction the kite takes, the crows follow, filling the sky with their crazy noise… The kite goes East, the crows go East… The kite goes West, the crows go West… The kite goes North, the crows do the same… and, the kite goes South, the crows do, too.

Finally, the kite is tired and frustrated. It decides to drop the fish. And, as soon as the fish is dropped, the crows stop chasing the kite and go after the falling fish. The kite, now relieved of the stress, decides to settle down on the branch of a nearby tree… Sitting there, it watches the crazy sight… and declares:
“There goes, with that wretched fish, all my misery!”

(P.S.:  I had first come across this story in the book 'TALES AND PARABLES OF SRI RAMAKRISHNA PARAMAHAMSA' published by Ramakrsihna Mission. I am deeply indebted to this master story-teller.)




GERALD D’CUNHA

Thursday, June 23, 2016

UDTA PUNJAB... I AM NOT A LOSER, NOT STILL BROKEN







Pic.: Anima D'Cunha


Seconds before my wife and I walked into the theatre, last evening, I received a phone call from one of our friends, a lady. When I told her that we were walking into the theatre, she asked, “Which movie?”

“Udta Punjab,” I replied.

“It’s a dark movie,” our friend warned, “It might disturb you.”

Both my wife and I knew ‘Udta Punjab’ would be a hard-hitting and a no-nonsense movie and we were prepared for it… So, I did not let our friend’s view cloud mine…

My wife and I both loved the movie.

And, yes, we both have been great fans of Alia Bhatt… and, here was one more reason why we had to admire her even more.

To me, the movie is about ‘hope’ and ‘despair’ of individuals…

There is this one scene where Shahid Kapoor and Alia Bhatt, who were deeply addicted and who were on the run, meet at a hiding place. They click. Shahid, despite tasting stardom as a rock star, now has resigned as a ‘Loser’… He has even declared it with his hair-cut. Alia, despite being a village field-hand, and having gone through ‘hell’ all along, believes there ‘is’ a better tomorrow… She wants to live. When Shahid thinks aloud and says to her, “Shall we both commit suicide?” She blasts, “Get lost… I am not a loser… I am not still broken.” Then, she tells him what she had been dreaming… “There was this huge hoarding I would see through the window of the house I was confined… It was about Goa… a young girl inviting me to come and relax on the serene beaches of Goa… I would see that image everyday and dream about the place… that day… that moment of freedom… It called me every day as I kept living in misery.”

These may not be the exact dialogues of Alia. But, this is, certainly, the message…

Alia doesn’t want to end her life as a ‘loser’, and she sees that her ‘stranger- friend’ – Shahid, too, doesn’t end-up as one.

Is ‘Udta Punjab’ a dark movie?

I think, it is ‘bright’!

GERALD D’CUNHA

Wednesday, June 22, 2016

IS 8 O'CLOCK TOO EARLY, BETA?







Pic.: Shoba N Krishnan


Some of my twelfth-standard students, whose college timings are in the afternoon, had joined the morning batch in my classes. The batch timing was 9 to 10, thrice a week. Two days ago, the majority of these students approached me to change the timings to 8 to 9. As I was discussing this issue, I found a couple of students throwing a lot of resistance...

“Why… What is your problem?” I asked them.

“Sir, it is too early,” the answer was unanimous.

Had the answer been, “Sir, we have another tuition class at 8,” or “Sir, my Gym or Cricket- coaching timings are clashing,” or, “Sir, I have to help my mom in the kitchen (Most unlikely, though!”)… yes, had the answer been one of these, I would have empathized with my resisting students…

But, “Sir, it is too early”?

“Nothing doing," I blasted, "it will be 8 from the next class.”

Today was the ‘next class’. I was keen to note the impact of my decree. Surprisingly, the attendance was one-hundred percent… and, guess what: my resisting students were the first to arrive!

“Excellent,” I applauded, “see how good you feel about yourself.”

“But, sir, can’t get up!” one of them meowed.

“Well, I can understand that, beta,” I empathized, knowing very well that they had been so used to getting up late, all these days, just because they had to go to college in the afternoon. “It is just a matter of forming a new habit – of getting up a little earlier, that’s all… Form that habit… and, do it by choice, gladly, willingly… It becomes self-discipline, a part of your character… It makes you more confident in life, more productive… You know, you are in twelfth standard… It is a crossroad… This is the time to plan your career… develop some new skills, prepare for some competitive exams… And, you can do all these things only if you learn to manage your time well… One or two hours saved every day, over the year, has stupendous cumulative effect… Trust me, it has.”

Then I gave my own example. “I will be 58 this July. This ‘my’ class… I can start my day at 10, 11 or 12 if I so wish… It’s my call. But, I purposely keep a class at 7.45 or 8 so that it brings in me a self-disciple of getting up early every day. So, I get up between 6 and 6.30 latest. I do all my morning routines and leave home early… It keeps me mentally and physically agile, offers me more time in hand to do what I love doing the most – my blogging and writing… It makes me more independent, more confident in life… Tougher and more resilient.”

One of the resisting girls’s (the one who had meowed) uncle was my dear old-student. When he was her age, their family was going through a lot of financial hardship. This young boy was doubly motivated to do something about their house condition. He had three sisters to marry off (one of them was our girl’s mother)… So, he planned his future in such a way that he, soon, went aboard for his studies, found a great job in London and, now, for the past fifteen years, he has been living there with his family… Yes, helping his young niece, back home, financially, too…

I spoke about the focus and determination of our girl’s uncle in the class, this morning… and, I could see her eyes sparkle, even though they were moist!

“Is 8 o’clock too early, beta?” I teased.

The young head just nodded left to right… and right to left!

GERALD D’CUNHA

Tuesday, June 21, 2016

THREE LEGS OF THE STOOL CALLED SELF-CONFIDENCE






Pic.: Anima D'Cunha


On 12th June, 2016, The Dawn Club Centre of Excellence had published its latest book – ‘WHAT MAKES ME CONFIDENT’. I wish to share with you, in today’s blog, the ‘Afterword’ I had written for this book…

Several years ago, I found a small book by the title - ‘Changes’. It was a book written for adolescents and it carried guest articles from some of America's icons. All of them had shared in this book their stories – how they became confident and successful in life. What I loved the most about this book was the simple imagery used by the author (Mysteriously, I don’t remember the author’s name… and, I have failed to get it from every source I have tried) to explain to little-ones how to be self-confident in life. I loved the imagery so much, that, over all these years, I have shared it with my own students – both, little-ones and young-ones. Here is the imagery…

“Self-confidence is like a stool with three legs,” the author tells in the book, “If any of these three legs is not proper, the stool will not be proper.”

THE FIRST LEG: TAKE RESPONSIBILITY.
It really hit me hard when I first realized, that the less we complain in life, the less we blame and feel victimized, higher the chances of becoming stronger and confident. Being reactive to situations in our lives takes away the power from our souls… Blamers are losers in life… The ‘Poor me’ – our victim mindset – only keeps us imprisoned in life. Our sad stories may bring us sympathy… But, they won’t bring us success and confidence. What brings us success and confidence is our ability to respond to situations in our lives – the ‘response-ability’. It is being proactive, being in charge... It comes from the realization – ‘My life is my business’… ‘My success is my responsibility’.

So, the more and more we take charge of the situations in our lives – the more and more we act responsible, become proactive - the more and more we become confident… stronger and wiser in life.

Thus, the author, drilled into the tiny heads the simple truth, that if the first leg of the stool was not okay, their confidence could not be okay.

THE SECOND LEG: FEEL WORTHWHILE.
How can we feel confident and strong if we do not feel worthwhile? None of us are good at everything… But, aren’t we all good at something?

So, the more we become aware of the things we are good at… we inevitably feel confident in life.

Each one of us has been blessed with a talent or two… Talents are God-given… they are our natural endowments, our gifts. Some of us can dance, sing or draw… some of us can play, cook, teach or preach. Earlier we discover these gifts, the earlier we become confident in life… and, the longer we enjoy our success.

Our skills are honed by us. When a talent is honed, polished, fine-tuned under a Master – in a school – it becomes a skill. We all hone many such skills… some are technical and processional skills, some are soft skills… Many of them we hone under a Master, in school… and, many we hone on our own.

In my case, I discovered when I was in my first year of B.Com, that teaching was my talent… God’s gift. I honed it as a fine skill all on my own. Slowly, I also realized that writing, too, was my talent… a gift from God. Again, I began to hone it into a fine skill by expressing myself every day through my writings…

Our strengths are our strong personality traits which are positive… Like, in my case…

I can be very punctual… I can be very committed… I can be very loyal and honest… I can mix with all types of people… I can be very patient… I can manage with little cash… I am not very fussy about food… I forgive and forget fast… I make peace… I can resolve conflicts of other people… I can see the extra-ordinary in the ordinary… I can walk the extra-mile… and so on.

The weaknesses our negative personality traits… Like in my case, I am weak in money-management… I lose my temper often… I get intense and serious soon… Humor doesn’t come easily to me… I worry often… even tend to panic… Take fewer risks to learn new things…

But, I have learnt one thing: When we become aware of our weaknesses and are willing to overcome them, it is a great strength. It is only when we keep justifying our weaknesses, that  they do more harm to us.

So, the author drilled in the tender skulls the need to get in touch with their talents, skills, strengths and weaknesses… He explained to the kids, that the more and more they became aware of what they were good at… what was special about them… the more and more they felt worthwhile, and thereby, confident…

Seriously, nobody can feel confident without feeling worthwhile - good and productive inside.

That is the second leg on which the stool of self-confidence stands.

THIRD LEG: FEEL APPRECIATED.
Appreciation – the positive feedback – is the food that nurtures our heart. As kids, we yearned for it… as young and adults, too, we continue to yearn for it. If we have received sufficient appreciation when we need it – on our little victories and successes… it is likely that we have grown to become confident individuals. On the other hand, if we have received more of criticism and indifference from people who mattered in our lives, it is likely that we have grown to be less confident.

I always tell my students this: “If we have not been appreciated and complimented enough by our near and dear ones, and if it has affected our self-confidence – all that we need to do now is, look back and smile… be compassionate to those who have been harsh or critical to us… Just don’t blame, don’t get into self-pity or blame. That very freedom will enable us to self nurture our hearts… and become more confident…

Even that comes from taking responsibility…

I, also, tell all our little and young-ones this: “What you can do is – you can appreciate others… give them sincere compliments… thank them profusely… And, by doing this, you become more and more a ‘giving person’… You become more confident, stronger and wealthier… The more you give, the more you receive… What goes around comes around…

Then, I tell them about the inspiring poem by Bruce Barton - ‘Two Seas’…

River Jordon flows down in two different directions… On the one side, it joins the Sea of Galilee. The sea of Galilees a generous sea… It doesn’t keep the water it receives from the river Jordon… Every drop of water it receives, it gives… So, it constantly flows… Thus, there is life around it, a great buzz… There are fishes in its water and there are birds up in the sky… Boatmen go about singing and businessmen go about doing business… There are townships and people there are prosperous…

On the other side, the river Jordon joins another sea… This sea is stingy and insecure… It jealously guards the water it receives. Every drop of water it receives, it hoards with fear…. So, there is no movement there… Water is still, no fishes live in it… The air above is thick, no birds fly over there… There are no boatmen, no songs heard… Nobody does business around it… Nobody lives… This sea is called ‘The Dead Sea’!

What has made this difference? Not the river Jordon. She gives her water, in equal measure, to both the seas… One gives it away, generously and prospers… while the other hoards and stagnates…

The poem ends with these inspiring lines…
“There are two kinds of people in this world…
“There are two seas in Palestine.”

God gives all of us in equal measure... just as river Jordon does. The best way to feel empowered - strong and confident - in life is by giving to others what we receive from God… Yes, by contributing.

We cannot contribute and feel weak at the same time. Never!

GERLAD D’CUNHA