Posts

Showing posts from August, 2016

I JUST CALLED TO SAY...

Image
Pic.: Alex D

“But smiles and tears are so alike with me, neither of them confined to any particular feelings: I, often, cry when I am happy, and smile when I am sad.”

― Anne Bronte
Acouple of days ago, Mrs., Patel, sent me this message: “Good morning sir. Shreeshay (son) had come 2nd in his college for drama monologue. And I give all the credit to you (The Dawn Club) as he got an opportunity to perform as a host and experience to organize such event. So, thank you for the grooming. I really appreciate your efforts .”
I quickly replied: 

“Hi ma'am, I am really glad and proud. Please convey my wishes to Shreeshay and would like to see him shine more. Love.”
The same evening, Jeet, who currently pursues his MBA, called me up. He said:
“Sir, I just felt strongly inside that I should thank you,”
‘Why, what happened, Jeet?” I enquired.  

BEYOND THE GOLD, SILVER AND BRONZE

Image
Pic.: Vinod Vazirani

“It is your response to winning and losing that makes you a winner or a loser.” - Harry Sheehy
Carolina Marin of Spain definitely played better than Sindhu, yesterday. So, she deserved the Gold.
And, our Sindhu?
I, too, watched the badminton (singles) Olympics finals, last evening (on my cell-phone), along with my wife. And, I did that like all my fellow-Indians and like all others who rooted for Sindhu. I wanted her to win… and, when she did win the first game, I felt immensely happy. But, then, I knew, somewhere along, that it would be Carolina… and not Sindhu.
That’s sports. True sports. The winner takes it all…
Well, this Post is not about winning and losing in Olympics. This is about that amazing quality called sportsmanship… which, our Sindhu, delightfully displayed after she lost that all-important contest, watched by millions of people, all over the world. It is that little gesture which Sindhu exhibited by going across to the winner, Carolina, who still lay fla…

THE GOOSE THAT LAID GOLDEN EGG

Image
Pic.: Chetna Shetty


Years ago, when I had decided to do something about my poor English, one of the things I did – and found it very useful – was telling a nice story in two tenses… Past and Present. Over the years, I have helped hundreds of people who were earnest to improve their English with the same method… Yes, write a nice story down in both the tenses… and tell it to someone.
This popular Aesop’s fable was one of the earliest childhood stories I had heard. But, the temptation seems so familiar and lifelong!



THE GOOSE THAT LAID GOLDEN EGG


PAST:

In a certain town, there lived a man and his wife. They owned a goose which was special. It laid a golden egg every morning. This made the couple reasonably rich and happy.
But, one morning, after the goose had laid the day’s egg, the wife said to her husband, “This goose just gives us only one golden egg a day. Just imagine how quickly we can become wealthy if we could have all the eggs in one go!”
“That sounds great,” agreed the husband, “We d…

CROCODILE TEARS

Image
Pic.: Avinash Mantri



Years ago, when I had decided to do something about my poor English, one of the things I did – and found it very useful – was telling a nice story in two tenses… Past and Present. Over the years, I have helped hundreds of people who were earnest to improve their English with the same method… Yes, write a nice story down in both the tenses… and tell it to someone.

The English phrase ‘Crocodile tears’(false tears/ insincere display of emotion)derives from an ancient belief thatcrocodilesshedtears while consuming their prey. But, then, I would love to believe that our own popular Panchatantra-story has something to do with it…



CROCODILE TEARS

PAST:
On the banks of a river stood a huge mango tree. On the tree lived a monkey. A crocodile often came near the tree to eat the mangoes dropped by the monkey. The monkey and the crocodile became good friends.
One day, the crocodile took a mango home for his wife. “What a delicious fruit this is!” exclaimed the lady crocodile, “Who…

THE CROCODILE TEARS

Image
Pic.: Avinash Mantri


Years ago, when I had decided to do something about my poor English, one of the things I did – and found it very useful – was telling a nice story in two tenses… Past and Present. Over the years, I have helped hundreds of people who were earnest to improve their English with the same method… Yes, write a nice story down in both the tenses… and tell it to someone.

The English phrase ‘Crocodile tears’(false tears/ insincere display of emotion)derives from an ancient belief thatcrocodilesshedtears while consuming their prey. But, then, I would love to believe that our own popular Panchatantra-story has something to do with it…



 CROCODILE TEARS

PAST:

On the banks of a river stood a huge mango tree. On the tree lived a monkey. A crocodile often came near the tree to eat the mangoes dropped by the monkey. The monkey and the crocodile became good friends.
One day, the crocodile took a mango home for his wife. “What a delicious fruit this is!” exclaimed the lady crocodile, “Wh…

THE LION’S SHARE

Image
Pic.: Chetna Shetty


Years ago, when I had decided to do something about my poor English, one of the things I did – and found it very useful – was telling a nice story in two tenses… Past and Present. Over the years, I have helped hundreds of people who were earnest to improve their English with the same method… Yes, write a nice story down in both the tenses… and tell it to someone.
Today, the English phrase ‘Lion’s Share’ means a ‘bigger share’ or ‘better share’. But, long time ago, it meant ‘everything’.


THE LION’S SHARE

PAST:

One day, Lion, the king of the jungle, went for hunting. He took along some of his friends for help. By the end of the day, they gathered a large pile of meat… It was time for sharing.
The lion made four equal parts.
Pointing at the first share, the lion roared, “I am the king of the jungle. So, this share belongs to me. Any problem… Any objection?”
“No sire,” the animals replied.
Pointing at the second share, the lion thundered, “This is for my wife, the lioness… Your…

ACHILLES’ HEEL

Image
Pic.: Chetna Shetty
Years ago, when I had decided to do something about my poor English, one of the things I did – and found it very useful – was telling a nice story in two tenses… Past and Present. Over the years, I have helped hundreds of people who were earnest to improve their English with the same method… Yes, write a nice story down in both the tenses… and tell it to someone.
I have narrated this story to young Achilles’ in  our P.D. sessions countless times. Yes, to convey to them as to what the English phrase, ‘Achilles’ Heel’, really means.
‘Achilles Heel’ is our weak spot … Our vulnerable area. But, then, it no longer refers to a physical weak spot. Today, it refers to a psychological and character-related weak spot.
Hope, the legend of Achilles doesn’t cease to inspire…


ACHILLES’ HEEL

PAST:

In Greek mythology, Achilles was a great warier. The legend has it, that when he was born, it was foretold, that he would die young. So, to prevent this fate from falling upon him, his mother…

WHO WILL BELL THE CAT?

Image
Pic.: Vincent D'Souza


Years ago, when I had decided to do something about my poor English, one of the things I did – and found it very useful – was telling a nice story in two tenses… Past and Present. Over the years, I have helped hundreds of people who were earnest to improve their English with the same method… Yes, write a nice story down in both the tenses… and tell it to someone.
Well, don’t tell me “I know this story.”


WHO WILL BELL THE CAT?



PAST:

There was a grocer’s shop where a large number of mice resided. The mice feasted on fresh cheese, biscuits, wheat, rice and sugar and lived there happily. But, the grocer was a worried man… He worried about his losses and thought of putting an end to the mice menace. Thus, he brought a hefty cat and placed it in his shop. The cat began to catch and eat mice one by one… The mice were so terrorized that they dared not to come out of their holes.
Then, one day, when the cat was not around, the mice called for an emergency meeting to discus…

THE SILENCE OF FOUR DISCIPLES

Image
Pic.: Avinash Mantri


Years ago, when I had decided to do something about my poor English, one of the things I did – and found it very useful – was telling a nice story in two tenses… Past and Present. Over the years, I have helped hundreds of people who were earnest to improve their English with the same method… Yes, write a nice story down in both the tenses… and tell it to someone.
I like this story. Several years ago, my friend, Mr. Manjeet, had recounted it to our ‘young disciples’ during a P.D. session.
Silence is tough…Very tough. And, the mind can be so funny! After reading, writing teaching and preaching for decades, I am only able to see myself somewhere there among those four amazing disciples!



THE SILENCE OF FOUR DISCIPLES

PAST:

One day, a Zen master wanted his four disciples to observe a day-and-night silence. He asked his servant to guide them to a nearby room. “Please light the lamp when darkness falls,” the Master instructed the servant.
For an entire day, the four disciples s…
THE WILD, WAYSIDE FLOWERS
There is, always, something extra-ordinary in the wild, wayside flowers...